editing disabled

Igliashon Jones is a guitarist and "composer" living in Oakland, California. He no longer identifies with microtonalism or the Xenharmonic movement, but formerly was a very active participant in it. He recorded several albums of microtonal music under the alias "City of the Asleep", but ultimately removed them from his websites after deciding they were not consistent with his aesthetic goals and standards as a musician. They may still be available somewhere on the internet. Despite his public disavowal of microtonality and his return to focusing on 12edo composition, he continues to occasionally write and record music in one alternative tuning: 15edo.

Anti-Microtonality

After many years participating in online discussion forums like the Yahoo! Tuning List, nonoctave.com, and the Xenharmonic Alliance, Igliashon reached the conclusion that microtonalism as a philosophy is deeply flawed. His view is that microtonalism leads to an obsessive focus on a single aspect of music--the intonation of pitches--and the neglect of other aspects, and conversely a sort of attention deficit disorder in tuning exploration, wherein composers and theorists are constantly seeking new tunings, rather than deeply exploring a single one (or select few). This makes inter-musician cooperation difficult, as few microtonalists use the same tunings as each other, and also ensures that it is impossible to attain a deep understanding of what any new tuning actually offers in terms of compositional resources.

It is Igliashon's view that microtonalism--which he defines as "the belief that intonation is of greater importance than any other compositional resource"--is nothing more than an intermediary step between ignorance of alternative tunings and making a conscious and informed commitment to a new intonational system that meets one's personal musical desiderata. What he believes is necessary is for composers to "exit" the movement by completing the exploratory phase and coming to a conclusion about what does and does not work for them, and then to focus in depth on developing a cohesive practical and compositional approach to the new tuning (or tunings) of their choice. At this point, he argues, it becomes possible to cease treating the tuning as the primary compositional focus--to "compose for the tuning"--and to compose holistically again, as one once did when still ignorant of intonational alternatives--to "compose in the tuning". The ideal point to reach with a tuning, in Igliashon's view, is the point where the features of the tuning can be taken for granted, and manipulated as effortlessly as one speak's one's native language. Microtonalism as a philosophy makes this point impossible to reach, because the features of a tuning can never be taken for granted (since they are the primary focus).

15edo

After exploring every equal temperament between 5 and 31 for many years, Igliashon settled on 15edo as having the optimal combination of practicality, consonance, dissonance, familiar resources, and novel resources.
edo
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Variety of Consonant Harmony*








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Variety of Good Scales








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Enforces Melodic Novelty*
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No "Microtones"
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Easy to Exploit on Guitar*
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Easy to Avoid Discordance
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*For this criterion, I'm awarding an x to any tuning that approximates at least the 5-limit tonality diamond with a max error of 20 cents.
For this criterion, I'm awarding an x to any tuning wherein there are at least four rank-2 scale systems that are very well-supplied with consonant chords and do not have microtonal step-sizes (narrower than ~66.67 cents).
*For this criterion, I'm awarding an x to any tuning that has no interval between 233.33 and 166.67 cents (i.e., no recognizable whole-tones).
For this criterion, I'm awarding an x to any tuning that has no steps smaller than 66.67 cents, i.e. where its smallest step is still recognizable as a semitone.
*For this criterion, I'm awarding an x to any tuning that I've subjectively found to be ergonomic on guitar, and whose novel scalar resources are easy to learn and map out on the fretboard.
For this criterion, I'm awarding an x to any tuning where I've subjectively found it easy to compose melodies over progressions of concordant chords that make use of non-chord tones, but which do not cause an excessive increase in discordance when doing so.