editing disabled

John Lank Moriarty (Born the 25th of March, 1992) is a student and composer of mircrotonal music, presently teaching voice in eastern Pennsylvania.

He releases most of his tuning-related material on his youtube page and his soundcloud page.


Some of my crazy ramblings:

Inspiration: What notes are diatonic to C as a tonic? Does it depend on the mode? I don’t think so. I think that twelve notes, the six fifths above and below, are all “diatonically” related to C, which I think lines up with the description of “mode mixture”.

With a Tonic C, then, the “diatonic” notes are:
C Db D Eb E F F# Gb G Ab A Bb B

So let’s make our solfeggio all about whether we’re using the major or minor interval above the tonic instead of all about a single important mode and modifications thereof!

Let’s name those notes diatonic to C as follows:

Do Ra Ri Ma Mi Fa Fi Sa Si La Li Ta Ti

Where one sized generic intervals (unisons and octaves) and their chroma shifts are named
diminished, perfect, or augmented
and have the endings
-e, -o, and -u, respectively

And then two sized generic intervals and their chroma shifts are named
diminished, minor, major, or augmented
and have the endings
-e, -a, -i, and -u, respectively

Lydian- Do Ri Mi Fi Si Li Ti Do (All -i endings because they’re all major to the tonic.)
Ionian- Do Ri Mi Fa Si Li Ti Do
Mixolydian- Do Ri Mi Fa Si Li Ta Do
Dorian- Do Ri Ma Fa Si Li Ta Do
Aolean- Do Ri Ma Fa Si La Ta Do
Phrygian- Do Ra Ma Fa Si La Ta Do
Locrain- Do Ra Ma Fa Sa La Ta Do (All -a endings because they are all minor to the tonic.)

Harmonic Minor- Do Ri Ma Fa Si La Ti Do

Melodic major- Do Ri Mi Fa Si La Ta Do

Harmonic Major- Do Ri Mi Fa Si La Ti Do

Double Harmonic- Do Ra Mi Fa Si La Ti Do

Lydian aug2- Do Ru Mi Fi Si Li Ti Do

Aolean dim6- Do Ra Ma Fa Sa La Te